4-day Break

These will be very busy days for me over the next 4 days, so I will pause from writing. Be back on 5/13. Thank you for making Neal Obstat part of your life. I never pass a single day without feeling grateful amazement that you do.

I will leave you with 3 goodies for reflection.

1. This 38 minute video on same sex attraction, called The Third Way, is exceptional:

2. I have this quote from St. John of the Cross framed for frequent viewing, and hopefully for eventual cardiac engraving. I’ve quoted it here a dozen or so times, but, since I still find it just as fresh after 11 years of rumination, I hope you will as well. Just substitute the word “monastery/religious life” with you own state in life or life circumstance.

…engrave this truth on your heart. And it is that you have not come to the monastery for any other reason than to be worked and tried in virtue; you are like the stone that must be chiseled and fashioned before being set in the building. Thus you should understand that those who are in the monastery are craftsmen placed there by God to mortify you by working and chiseling at you. Some will chisel with words, telling you what you would rather not hear; others by deed, doing against you what you would rather not endure; others by their temperament, being in their person and in their actions a bother and annoyance to you; and others by their thoughts, neither esteeming nor feeling love for you. You ought to suffer these mortifications and annoyances with inner patience, understanding that you did not enter the religious life for any other reason than for others to work you in this way, and so you become worthy of heaven. If this was not your reason for entering the religious state, you should not have done so, but should have remained in the world to seek your comfort, honor, reputation, and ease.

3. In honor of this season of unchained joy, let me share with you the wisdom of Pope emeritus Benedict XVI:

Something I constantly notice is that unembarrassed joy has become rarer. Joy today is increasingly saddled with moral and ideological burdens, so to speak. When someone rejoices, he is afraid of offending against solidarity with the many people who suffer. I don’t have any right to rejoice, people think, in a world where there is so much misery, so much injustice.

I can understand that. There is a moral attitude at work here. But this attitude is nonetheless wrong. The loss of joy does not make the world better – and, conversely, refusing joy for the sake of suffering does not help those who suffer. The contrary is true. The world needs people who discover the good, who rejoice in it and thereby derive the impetus and courage to do good. Joy, then, does not break with solidarity. When it is the right kind of joy, when it is not egotistic, when it comes from the perception of the good, then it wants to communicate itself, and it gets passed on. In this connection, it always strikes me that in the poor neighborhoods of, say, South America, one sees many more laughing happy people than among us. Obviously, despite all their misery, they still have the perception of the good to which they cling and in which they can find encouragement and strength.

In this sense we have a new need for that primordial trust which ultimately only faith can give. That the world is basically good, that God is there and is good. That it is good to live and to be a human being. This results, then, in the courage to rejoice, which in turn becomes commitment to making sure that other people, too, can rejoice and receive good news.

Popes Francis and Benedict at Canonization Mass. Taken from media3.s-nbcnews.com

One comment on “4-day Break

  1. WoopieCushion says:

    I’m really glad I took time to watch that video. Blessed labors brother.

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